TransMacv17.0 注册版,不必再找TransMacv破解版能在Windows系统中直接读取Mac格式的存储介质,非常好用,用TransMac可以读、写、格式化Macintosh的磁盘,CDROMs,与SCSI,Drives。Mac OS支持读取FAT格式的Windows磁盘,而Windows却不支持Mac的专有格式,如果你的MAC主机上安装WINDOWS了,又需要访问MAC系统光盘,硬盘分区,可以使用TransMac来读取。TransMac还可以打开DMG文件,修改和操作里面的文件。

 

Below are instructions for performing some common operations in TransMac.

Navigation Tips:

  • TransMac works like File Explorer. Select disks, disk images and folders
    in the treeview pane on the left. Contents of the selected treeview item are
    displayed in the listview pane on the right. Most operations can be
    performed with the right-click context menus.
    Treeview navigation:

    • Right click on treeview items or in an open area to display a pop-up
      menu of valid operations.
    • Use up and down arrow keys to traverse the folder tree.
    • If a drive has been added since TransMac was run, right-click in an
      open area and select “Refresh Drive List”.

    Listview navigation:

    • Right click on listview items or in an open area to display a pop-up
      menu of valid operations.
    • Press letter keys repeatedly to cycle through items starting with
      that letter.
    • Press Ctrl-A to select all items in a list box.
    • Select a group of items by clicking on the first item, scrolling to
      the last item, then holding down the “Shift” key while clicking on the
      last item.
    • Select non-consecutive individual items by holding the “Ctrl” key
      while clicking on them.
    • Select files of a certain type by pressing the “Type” listbox header
      to sort by type.

Copying files from a Mac volume to the PC:

  • Select a drive in the treeview pane and click on a Mac volume.
  • Browse the Mac volume for the files to be copied.
  • Drag them from the listview pane to a File Explorer window or other drop
    target. (An alternate way is to right-click the items and select “Copy to”)

Copying files from the PC to a Mac volume:

  • Select a drive in the treeview pane and click on a Mac volume.
  • Browse to where files are to be copied.
  • Drag files from a File Explorer window or other drag source to the
    listview pane. (An alternate way is to right-click an open area in the
    listview pane and select “Copy here”)

Creating a folder on a Mac volume:

  • Open a volume and browse to where the new folder is to be created.
  • Right-click an open area in the listview pane and select “New Folder”.
    (An alternate way is to press the  button)
  • Enter the name of the folder and press OK.

Deleting files/folders on a Mac volume:

  • Open a volume and browse for the files/folders to be deleted .
  • Right-click and select “Delete”. (An alternate way is to press the  button)
  • CAUTION: Deleting a folder will delete all subfolders inside it as
    well.

Renaming files on a Mac volume:

  • Open a volume and browse for the file/folder to be renamed in the
    listview.
  • Right-click and select “Rename”. (An alternate way is to select the
    file/folder then click the name in the listview)
  • Edit the name in place then press Enter or click outside the name. Press
    escape (Esc) to cancel and revert to the original name.

Previewing files on a Mac volume:

  • Open a volume and browse for the file to preview in the listview.
  • Double-click the item to preview. (An alternate way is to right-click
    and select “Open”)
  • The file will be opened using the PC application associated with the
    file type or extension.
  • To open a file in notepad, right-click and select “Open as Text”.
  • To open with a different application, right-click and select “Open
    with”. You will be prompted to select an application.
  • NOTE: When opening a file from a Mac disk, TransMac copies it to a
    temporary folder on the PC. Any changes to the file will be written to the
    temporary copy, not the Mac disk.

Opening a disk image:

  • By default the TransMac installation program associates Mac disk image
    files (.dmg and .sparseimage extensions) with TransMac so double-clicking
    those files should open them in TransMac.
  • To explicitly open disk images with other extensions select “Open Disk
    Image” from the file menu or right-click an open area of the treeview pane
    and select “Open Disk Image”.
  • The disk image file should now show up in the treeview pane. Clicking
    the file should open it if it contains a valid Mac volume.

Creating a disk image:

  • Select “New Disk Image” from the file menu or right-click an open area
    of the treeview pane and select “New Disk Image”.
  • Enter the desired volume label.
  • Select the disk image type (dmg or sparseimage). (If the disk image is
    for creating a Mac CD or DVD be sure to use dmg here)
  • Select the volume type (HFS+ or HFS).
  • Enter a volume size in megabytes.
  • Enter or browse (“…” button) for the destination file name.

Compressing an uncompressed .dmg disk image:

  • Right-click the dmg file in the treeview pane and select “Compress”.
  • Enter the destination file name in the “Save As” dialog.

Expanding (convert to iso) a compressed .dmg disk image:

  • Right-click the dmg file in the treeview pane and select “Expand”.
  • Enter the destination file name in the “Save As” dialog.

Formatting a disk for the Mac:

  • Right-click a drive in the treeview pane and select “Format Disk for
    Mac”.
  • Enter the desired volume label.
  • Select
    standard HFS or extended (HFS+) volume format. Press OK.
  • CAUTION: Make sure you want to format the disk. Any existing data on
    the disk will be destroyed.

Formatting a disk with a disk image:

  • Right-click a drive in the treeview pane and select “Restore with Disk
    Image”.
  • Browse for the disk image to be written. Compressed dmg files will be
    uncompressed before they are written.
    CAUTION: Make sure you really want to over write the disk. Any existing
    data on the disk will be destroyed.

Saving an image of a disk:

  • Right-click a drive in the treeview pane and select “Save Image of
    Disk”.
  • Select the location for the saved image file.

Burning a .dmg file to CD or DVD:

  • Select “Burn CD/DVD” from the “Tools” menu or right-click the .dmg image
    in the treeview and select “Burn to CD/DVD”.
  • Select the burn drive.
  • Browse for the .dmg file path.
  • Click OK to start the burn process.

Burning an ISO image to CD or DVD:

  • Since TransMac has an internal burning functionality, it can burn any
    ISO or CD/DVD image file.
  • Select “Burn CD/DVD” from the “Tools” menu.
  • Select the burn drive.
  • Browse for the ISO image file name.
  • Click OK to start the burn process.

Creating a Mac CD or DVD:

  • Follow the directions for “Creating a disk image” above. Be sure to
    select dmg for the image type.
  • You can save burn time by creating a smaller volume, but it can not be
    enlarged once it is created. The volume size should not be greater than the
    capacity of the target media. A CD-R has a limit of about 650-700 MB. A
    DVD-R has a limit around 4.7GB. To use the full capacity of the media select
    the drive in the “Get size from CD media” box to read the size from inserted
    media.
  • Open the disk image and copy the files and folders you want on to be on
    the CD.
  • Right-click the dmg in the treeview pane and select “Burn to CD/DVD”.
    (An alternate way is to select “Burn CD/DVD” from the “Tools” menu)
  • Select the burn drive.
  • Browse for the .dmg file path.
  • Click OK to start the burn process.
  • NOTE: If  TransMacs CD burning capabilities are not working with your
    drive, you should be able burn the dmg using most software that can burn an
    iso image. You may need to change the extension from “dmg” to “iso” if the
    file is not recognized.

Erasing a rewritable CD or DVD:

  • Select “Erase CD/DVD” from the “Tools” menu.
  • Select the burn drive.
  • Click OK to start the erase process.

Files and File Systems


File Systems

A file system organizes large numbers of files on some sort of recording
medium (most commonly a disk drive or cd-rom). Mac and PC computers use
different primary file systems which is why a program like TransMac is
necessary.

Mac OS Extended (or HFS+) is the file system most used in OS X. It is an
enhanced version of the original HFS file system that came about early on in the
life of the Macintosh line when disks had relatively small capacities.
Limitations appeared in this format when disk drives grew very large in size.
Mac OS 10.3 brought a new  iteration of HFS+ called HFSX. HFSX is basically the
same as HFS+, but it allows for new file system features to be specified. One
such feature is case sensitive file/folder names. The file names “fname”,
“Fname” and “FNAME” would all refer to the same file in HFS/HFS+, but they would
refer to different files in HFSX if the case sensitive feature was turned on.
Below is a summary of the differences between the three file systems.

Mac OS Extended (HFS+):

  • Compatible with Mac OS8.1 and later
  • 255 character Unicode file names
  • No file size limit
  • Less wasted space

Mac OS Extended (HFSX):

  • New in OS X 10.3
  • Purpose is to allow extended features that will not be compatible with
    HFS+
  • One major feature is to allow case sensitive file names

Standard HFS:

  • Compatible with all Mac OS versions
  • File names limited to 31 characters
  • File sizes limited to 2GB
  • Large volumes with small files waste a lot of space.

Windows uses two primary types of file systems FAT (File Allocation Table) and
NTFS (New Technology File System). There are three variations of the FAT file
system: FAT12, FAT16 and FAT32. FAT12 and FAT16 are carry overs from the DOS
days. They had the same sort of problems HFS had due to growing  disk sizes.
FAT32 was created to alleviate some of these problems, but it still has
limitations like a maximum file size of 4GB. NTFS was created for Windows NT. It
does not have as many limitations as the FAT systems and also includes much
needed security and reliability features. Recent versions of Windows (NT, 2000,
XP, Vista, etc.) support both file system types, but older versions of Windows
(95, 98, Me) do not natively support NTFS.

There are several differences in the way Macs and PCs deal with files. On a PC,
a file appears as a single stream of bytes which can store any type of
information. On a Mac there can be two separate streams to a file called forks
that are linked to one name. The data fork stream of a Mac file is the
equivalent of a PC file. It can contain any type of data which may be used by an
application. The resource fork contains Mac specific resources (menus, fonts,
etc.). It is generally of no use on a PC. When files are copied from a Mac to a
PC the resource fork is usually discarded. One situation where the resource fork
would be used is when moving fonts between systems, but a conversion application
(like our CrossFont) will still be needed to convert the font.

Disk Images

Mac disk image files are just file systems written to a file instead of to a
raw disk. The Mac can mount them so they appear just like a disk drive. There
are several different types each with different options. Below are descriptions
of the types TransMac supports:

  • dmg: Files with a “dmg” extension are commonly used to transfer data
    or software installation packages. They can be compressed (read only) to save
    space or uncompressed (read/write) to allow writing.
  • sparseimage: Files with a “sparseimage” extension leave out unused
    blocks of the volume to save space. They start out small but grow as data is
    added. Sparse image files are read/write. They have no internal compression, but
    shrink well using external compression like zip.
    File TypesIt is useful to be able to determine what type of data a file contains and
    what application should be used to open it. This is done by attaching an
    extension
    to the name of the file separated by a period. A text file would
    be indicated by a “.txt” extension as in “file.txt” or an acrobat file by “.pdf”
    as in “document.pdf”. Each extension can be associated with a single application
    and assigned a unique icon. The appropriate application can then be invoked by
    clicking the files icon.

    Both Mac and PC can use file extensions but the Mac has an alternate
    mechanism which is more useful. This consists of two four character fields
    called the type and creator. These fields are stored in the file
    system separate from the file name and not directly viewable by the user. The
    type
    field tells the Mac what type of data is in the file. This may be
    “TEXT” to designate a text file or “TIFF” for a tiff graphic image. A Mac
    application can use the type field to show only certain pertinent files
    in an Open dialog box or to determine how to handle the file. The creator
    field tells the Mac what application should be used to open the file. This field
    is used when a data file is double-clicked to open it. These fields are
    invisible to the user, but can be displayed and changed with special utilities.

    TransMac has a facility to carry this information from one platform to the
    other. The TransMac
    file type map associates Mac file types (type/creator) with PC file types
    (file name extension) and vice versa. If the file type map option is selected
    when a file is copied, the map will be searched and automatically assign the
    appropriate file type. TransMac comes with many type map entries, but users can
    add more or change existing entries as new applications come out.

    Note: Files can not be converted to different types just by changing the
    extension or Mac type/creator field. These desigations tell the system what type
    of data is in the file. Changing them will cause the system to launch an
    application that will may recognize the file.

    Moving Files between Mac and PC

    TransMac can copy any file between PC and Mac disks, but it does not convert
    the files between formats. Software exists for performing many different
    conversions, but it is outside the realm of TransMac. A web or usenet search may
    turn up the required conversion software. Files can contain any type of data
    including programs, images, graphics, text, sound, music, etc. There are three
    classes of data files users should be aware of when moving files between
    platforms.

    First there are generic universal formats like mp3, mpg, gif, tiff, jpeg,
    midi, html/htm which are the same on both Mac and PC systems. These files can be
    opened by many different applications on many different systems.

    Second there are application specific files that can only be opened by a
    particular application. If the user does not have this application installed
    they will not be able to use the file. Some applications that have both Mac and
    PC versions are able to open the same file on either machine. The user can
    verify this capability with the maker of the application.

    Third are files that are used on one platform, but are of no use on the
    other. This includes program executables themselves since Mac and PC programs
    run in completely different environments.

    There are some file types that are prevalent on one system, but can still be
    opened on the other. For example, Stuffit is the preferred file compressor for
    the Mac, Zip is preferred on the PC, but software exists to use both on either
    system.

    Translations

    TransMac can do a few translations on files while it copies. This can be
    selected in the “Copy
    Settings” windows. Most file transfers should use the “Automatic”
    translation which automatically tries to determine the best way to copy
    individual files. MacBinary and BinHex are Macintosh specific formats which
    contain the information required to recreate both forks of
    a Mac file from a single stream of data. This type of file was mostly used for
    sending Mac files over telecommunication lines. They also allow a complete Mac
    file (both forks) to exist on a single stream system like PC or UNIX. These days
    a compression program like Stuffit is used instead.

    • Automatic: Should be used most of the time. Detects and decodes
      MacBinary and BinHex files during Mac to PC copy and automatically
      translates end of line codes for ASCII text files. Use “Data File”
      translation to copy these types of files without decoding or translation.
    • Data File: Copies to or from Mac data fork. Use if all files
      should be copied byte-for-tyte.
    • Resource File: Copies to or from Mac resource fork. Rarely used
      except for transferring fonts for conversion with CrossFont.
    • Text File: For ASCII text files only. Macs use a carriage return
      (CR) to end a line of text. PCs use a carriage return followed by a line
      feed (CRLF). This translation converts to the proper end of line code. Do
      not use this for non-ASCII files.
    • MacBinary: Decode or encode a MacBinary file while copying.
      BinHex: Decode or encode a BinHex (.hqx) file while copying.

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